Heart Health in Endurance Athletes: But at what cost?

This medical journey of mine has come at a cost. I’m not talking about a physical or mental cost, but an actual monetary cost. All the appointments and scans don’t come for free. Then again, what price do you put on your health? Out of interest, I thought I’d keep track of just how much it has cost me to get fully checked out.

Heart Health in Endurance Athletes: A full 3D scan and some news I didn’t want to hear

Sitting in my cardiologist’s office reading the report from my heart scans and tests, it was not the news I was expecting to get today. Very high risk. All these tests were meant to be precautionary, a journey to a “yep you’re fine” outcome, simply confirming that nothing untoward was occurring in my arteries. I didn’t expect bad news! I’m a clean-eating, clean-living hard-working endurance athlete. What does that even mean for me now and in the future?

Heart Health in Endurance Athletes: Bloodwork

When my doctor wrote out my pathology request, she told me that “if everything was fine with my blood test results, I wouldn’t hear from her.” Armed with that somewhat-comforting knowledge, I got myself down to the pathology lab and parted with three vials of blood. Around 48 hours later, I got a text asking me to book a follow-up appointment…

Heart Health in Endurance Athletes: What’s up, Doc?

As endurance athletes, we can put a LOT of stress on our hearts. Having previously decided to get a full heart and health check to know if there are any underlying issues, I booked my appointment with the GP and was all set to get the ball rolling on my heart health journey…

Heart Health in Endurance Athletes: Part 1

My Dad had a major heart attack at age 49. I’d knocked off work early that day so was at home to call the ambulance. Otherwise he likely would have died alone on the floor, or at best sustained permanent, life-changing damage. As endurance athletes, we can put a LOT of stress on our hearts. Of course this is a positive thing in good measure. Giving your heart a workout builds a strong heart! But what if there are any undiagnosed heart conditions lurking in the background? And is there a point where the sheer volume of high-stress endurance work is simply too much?